Karla Reid-Witt (240) 545-5323

©2019 by DD-DC

Inform and Motivate Policy-makers

The District's economic future is dependent on a well-educated, highly-skilled workforce. In today's world, high-quality education is the surest path out of intergenerational poverty. As education levels rise, incomes rise, while healthcare and public safety costs decline. Our mission is to make the case to policy-makers that a highly literate population is in everyone's best interest.


Therefore, Decoding Dyslexia DC, a parent-led, grassroots movement, is advocating for the following policy goals:


• A universal definition and description of “dyslexia” in the District's education code
• Mandatory teacher training on dyslexia, its warning signs, and appropriate intervention strategies
• Mandatory, universal early screening for risk factors 
• Mandatory dyslexia remediation programs, which can be accessed by both general and special education populations
• Access to appropriate “assistive technologies” in District schools for students with dyslexia and reading difficulties


We recognize the power of the collective parent voice and work diligently to encourage policy-makers to collaborate in the best interest of supporting families and advancing services for struggling students.

 

Be the 
change

Children are expected to 'read to learn' by fourth grade, but the vast majority of these students still lack reading ability. The contributing factors are complex and deeply entrenched, leading to one out of every three high school students to drop out of school, including 40 percent of low-income students.

This is unacceptable. This doesn't have to be.

We can change this situation by advocating for professional development for teachers and for early screening, effective reading interventions, and progress monitoring for students. 

With your engagement and advocacy, we can educate policy-makers on the extraordinarily detrimental social, economic, and human impacts of illiteracy, and together we can change outcomes for our District's students.

 

How does DC's reading scores stack up against those of the nation?